Why Adult Education Is Important (2)

Surrey Schools’ Adult Education department offers a variety of services, programs and schedules to assist students in identifying and achieving their educational and career goals. Part three discusses quality assurance in business teacher education and part four deals with four critical dimensions that must be covered in capacity building for business teacher education, namely; increasing […]

Surrey Schools’ Adult Education department offers a variety of services, programs and schedules to assist students in identifying and achieving their educational and career goals. Part three discusses quality assurance in business teacher education and part four deals with four critical dimensions that must be covered in capacity building for business teacher education, namely; increasing the number of lecturers, professional growth of business teacher education lecturers, enhancing business teacher education lecturers’ motivational level and improving supply of relevant equipment and facilities.adult education

The four presenters will talk about strategic planning for adult education in California (Vittoria Abbate-Maghsoudi, Mt. Diablo Adult Education), the role of technology in transition (me), transitioning students from non-credit ESL to credit ESL at the colleges (Greatchen Bitterlin, San Diego Community College District), and the importance of professional development (Karen Dennis, Santa Ana College).adult educationadult education

Therefore, from the analysis on Table 3 above, it be deduced that the major religious and cultural beliefs that affect women education include the belief: that women’s education ends in the kitchen; that education makes women to be wild, that women are forbidden from moving about at night due to occult practices, that educated women do not make good housewives, and that husbands do not allow their wives to attend classes.

The first of them is the same as that of the lifelong learning strategy for the years 2005-2008 – the implementation of the development plan gives adults better access both to formal education and non-formal education in order to improve the knowledge of people and the level of education of the population and to increase the percentage of people aged 25-64 participating in lifelong learning to 13.5% by 2013.

Speakers – Congresswoman Jackie Speier , Bob Harper of Campbell Adult School , Chris Nelson of CCAE , Mathew Kogan of Los Angeles Adult School , Ana Turetsky of Oakland Adult School , and many students (both former and current) powerfully laid out how we got into the mess we’re in now, what Adult Education offers to a wide a range of people, why it’s so important to find out a way out, and by way of their strength and the impact of their stories, evidence that we will.